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  • Ayiesha Woods “The Runway Project” Album Review

    The baseline question to ask every record is this: are the songs melodically arresting and are the lyrics flowing with God-saturated vocabulary? With Ayiesha Woods' latest release "Runway Project," the answer is yes to the two components of the question. Despite having only seven cuts and released independently, this record is better than some of Woods' full length albums when she was with Gotee Records.

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  • Hollyn "One-Way Conversations" Album Review

    Hollyn is what Amy Grant, Kathy Troccoli and Stacie Orrico were one generation ago. She's able to peddle the interest of secular ears (such as those who have grown up with Adele & Alessia Cara) as well as still hold onto her Gospel-centred mandate. Of late, contemporary music has been inundated with country music, worship music, and so much R&B undercurrents, but fewer and fewer are the purveyors of genuine pop music.

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  • Reba McEntire “Sing It Now: Songs of Hope and Faith” Album Review

    Reba McEntire has taken the road most travelled. When many country music veterans who find their star power waning with fewer and fewer top-tiered charting hits, they often revert to doing an oldies album or a Christmas record or as McEntire does in this instance, a Christian music project. It's easy to discount this as a nail on McEntire's #1 streaking days, but this is far from the Oklahoma native's dirge.

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  • Lauren Talley “The Gospel” Album Review

    Concept albums rarely work. Often songs don't fall naturally under an overarching theme. And if you try to nuance songs just to expound a theme, often they come across as caricature or repetitive. But not when the theme is as majestic and as encompassing as the Gospel of Jesus. This is because for any song to have any inherent value it needs to emanate out of the Gospel. Lauren Talley in this regard has done a stellar job in allowing these 10 songs to manifest the Gospel and its heuristic entailment.

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  • Jill Phillips “Lead Me Home” Album Review

    The titular of Jill Phillips' tenth album "Lead Me Home" is the best synopsis for the record. Returning back to her Southern roots and the earlier epoch of her own upbringing, Phillips has deftly chosen to record 10 hymns and Gospel favorites she has had grown up with. But unlike many other of her peers who have had travelled the same route, Phillips have avoided the pitfall of restricting her canon to just the tried and true hymns.

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  • The Guardians “Lift Him Up” Album Review

    Sometimes the man behind the record is more important than the person(s) appearing on the CD sleeve. The Guardian's debut record "Lift Him Up" is one such example. What makes this record open up fresh vistas to the word "majestic" is the album's producer Wayne Haun.

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  • Kari Jobe “The Garden” Album Review

    Kari Jobe's "The Garden" promises to be fecund with emotional and theological fruitfulness. After all, the album was cultivated during a season of loss and grief in Jobe's family. Moreover, though Jobe is the album's main gardener, she has also enlisted an A-list of horticulturists to assist her. This includes co-writers such as Hillsong's Brooke (Ligertwood) Fraser, Delirious?' Martin Smith, Jason Ingram and her own hubby and Gateway Worship's Cody Carnes.

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  • Brian and Jenn Johnson “After All These Years” Album Review

    It's hard to fathom that "After All These Years" is only the third duet album by songwriters and worship leaders Brian and Jenn Johnson. Despite the perennial and copious releases by Bethel Music, where the Johnsons serve as worship pastors, they have had not invested too much time in puffing up in their own personal repertoire.

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  • The Brilliance “All is Not Lost” Album Review

    The Brilliance is an iconoclast. If you are looking for music crystallized into predictable icons, stay clear of this new record. "All is Not Lost" isn't just your average album of songs with those big anthemic choruses coupled those recycled pedantic words.

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  • The Collingsworth Family “Brooklyn and Courtney” Album Review

    Like mother, like daughters. Three years ago, Kim Collingsworth released her magnum opus "Majestic," a collection of instrumental hymns and songs, which literally personifies the word "breathtaking."

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